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Remote healthcare technology offered free to care homes

Vtuls biosensor2 (1)

Remote healthcare technology that monitors residents’ vital signs is being offered free to care homes.

The Vtuls’ technology, which has FDA, CE and ISO approval and has been launched in seven countries, can remotely track more than 40 vital signs, including temperature, blood oxygen, blood pressure and pain, and sends an early warning alert to clinicians when deterioration occurs.

Clinical trials of the technology have shown improved patient outcomes, including reduced time in hospital and decreased healthcare costs such as heart failure, COPD and diabetes. The AI platform is also being used to monitor for COVID-19 in some countries.

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Jas Saini, Vtuls CEO and founder, said: “Earlier detection of COVID-19 cases in care homes would enable faster treatment of infected residents and reduce cluster outbreaks that occur when residents are isolated too slowly.

“Daily remote health monitoring of vital signs could play an important part in this. Not only would it uncover suspected cases earlier, therefore enabling better targeting of testing resources, it would also catch cases that occur after a resident has been given the all-clear from a previous test that would otherwise not be picked up until much later.

“We’re offering our proven, approved and easy-to-use technology for free to any care homes or care home groups that would like support to achieve those outcomes. The situation in care homes is something that needs urgent attention due to the huge risk the disease poses to people in that age group and we’d really like to help to protect the lives of these vulnerable patients.”

Swiss-based Vtuls is offering free use of its technology for the next three months to any care home operator that contacts them. The platform can be deployed within 48 hours, including delivery of equipment and comprehensive training of staff.

Tags : Best practiceInnovationmedical
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The author Lee Peart

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