Scottish care homes blast ‘inadequate funding’ deal amid closure fears

CARTER BAR, SCOTLAND – SEPTEMBER 14: (EDITORS NOTE: Image has been processed with digital filters) A Scottish Saltire flag flies on the border with England on September 14, 2014 in Carter Bar, Scotland. The latest polls in Scotland’s independence referendum put the No campaign back in the lead, the first time they have gained ground on the Yes campaign since the start of August. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

Private care home providers in Scotland have attacked a deal between the Government and councils for providing “grossly inadequate funding”.

Providers expressed concern over costs rising quicker than incomes as pressure on care services increase. Chief executive of Scottish Care – which represents care providers – Donald Macaskill, warned that some of its 400 members could go under.

Scottish Care is concerned over staffing costs and is angry at the Scottish Government for making it pay a living wage to its 100,000 workers in return for a funding deal.

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“We are profoundly concerned about the survival of some of our care homes,” Macaskill told The Herald.

“Many providers have expressed not only their disappointment with this funding but their sense of dismay and hurt. As they see it, the contribution of the care home sector to wider health and social care provision, is clearly viewed with such low esteem that the viability concerns for the sector have been so easily dismissed.

According to the report by The Herald, Macaskill said the sector was forced to accept a marginal uplift of 2.8% to the funding of care home placements made by local authorities.

Scottish Care said it will be left with a net 1% boost in funding for care homes in spite of significant cost pressures which have increased by approximately 8.5%.

A Scottish Government spokesperson told the newspaper: “We have already provided significant investment of £250 million, alongside a further £100 million next year, to support social care and ensure adult care workers receive the Living Wage.

“Everyone should receive quality care and support appropriate to their needs. We have seen the number of care services found to be providing good, very good or excellent care rise, and the on-going review of National Care Standards will ensure those using care services experience even better quality of care and support across health and social care services.”

Image: Getty

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