London conference helps bridge the care age divide

Judith Ish-Horowicz Photo credit: Ali Somers, Co-founder of Apples and Honey Nightingale

A Nightingale Hammerson conference has highlighted the benefits of intergenerational activity in care homes.

Care practitioners, researchers, and change-makers who are invested in the progress of intergenerational activities attended ‘Innovation in Care: Stories of Intergenerational Action’ at the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship (ICCE) at Goldsmiths, University of London.

The conference highlighted Nigthingale Hammerson’s Nightingale House in Clapham, which last September became the first care home in England to launch an on-site nursery (see First of its kind nursery opens).

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Judith Ish- Horowicz, Principal of Apples and Honey Nightingale, which runs the Nightingale House nursery, said: “It was so exciting to be part of the Innovations in Care conference where pioneering models of Intergenerational action were shared.

“The variety and quality of the projects was inspirational from Apples and Honey Nightingale where babes in arms and centenarians are learning together, to sustainable skills cafes where the elderly share traditional skills and crafts like darning and knitting with young families. I learnt so much and have come away bursting with new ideas and enthusiasm.”

Talks at the conference explored the benefits of intergenerational activity and the powerful fusion between children and older people, with a wide range of professionals showcasing their examples of social innovation, ranging from projects in care homes, early years nurseries, hospitals as well as small community-based and larger scale initiatives.

Stephen Burke, Director of think tank United for All Ages, said: “Britain is one of the most age segregated countries in the world. Care-home nurseries like Apples and Honey Nightingale can bring older and younger people together, benefiting them and other generations. That’s why we want to see 500 care home nurseries developed over the next five years across the UK.”



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