Dementia atlas reveals care post code lottery

BERLIN, GERMANY - MARCH 11:  Day guest Helga covered her face with her hands the middle of the room in the geriatric day care facility of the German Red Cross (DRK, or Deutsches Rotes Kreuz) at Villa Albrecht on March 11, 2013 in Berlin, Germany.  A great number of senior Citzens struggle with various forms of dementia at Villa Albrecht.  The German Red Cross dates its origin back to 1863 with the founding of the Wuerttembergischer Sanitaetsverein, a medical association that provided care to wounded soldiers. Today the German Red Cross has four million members nationwide and is active in international aid and social care.  (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)BERLIN, GERMANY – MARCH 11: Day guest Helga covered her face with her hands the middle of the room in the geriatric day care facility of the German Red Cross (DRK, or Deutsches Rotes Kreuz) at Villa Albrecht on March 11, 2013 in Berlin, Germany. A great number of senior Citzens struggle with various forms of dementia at Villa Albrecht. The German Red Cross dates its origin back to 1863 with the founding of the Wuerttembergischer Sanitaetsverein, a medical association that provided care to wounded soldiers. Today the German Red Cross has four million members nationwide and is active in international aid and social care. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

A ‘care atlas’ published by the Department of Health has revealed a wide gulf in standards across the country.

The detailed information shows how many people living with dementia have their care reviewed every year and how likely they are to die where they normally live, usually at a home or in a care home.

The data shows that 85.8% of patients in North East Lincolnshire have their care reviewed once a year, while this rate is just 49.3% in Somerset.

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Vale Royal, Cheshire came out top in terms of number of people able to die in their own home (83.1%), while Newham (East London) was the worst (33.9%).

While some areas have as many as 8,000 ‘dementia friends’ able to help those living with the condition, others have than none at all.

George McNamara, head of policy at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “The Atlas exposes varied care, with some areas reporting much higher numbers of emergency hospital admissions. We must urgently explore why people with dementia’s needs are escalating to this point and what can be done in the community to prevent crisis admissions among this vulnerable group.

“Additionally, in some parts of the country, people with dementia were much less likely to have had their care reviewed in the last 12 months than in others – something which is extremely important given that dementia is a progressive condition and a person’s needs become more severe over time. The causes of variation need to be investigated to ensure care is never a gamble.”

 Patients’ care plan reviewed every year   Patients able to die in own home 
 Worst (%) Worst (%) 
 Somerset 49.3%  Newham (East London) 33.9%
 West London 68.0%  Tower Hamlets
(East London) 39.0%
 Hounslow (West London) 68.6%  Hounslow (West London) 39.9%
 Newark & Sherwood (Notts) 69.7%  Waltham Forest (North East London) 40.9%
 Wokingham (Berks) 70.2%  Haringey (North London) 43.2%
 Best (%)  Best (%)
 North East Lincs 85.8%  Vale Royal (Cheshire) 83.1%
 City and Hackney
(North London) 84.6%
 North, East & West Devon 82.2%
 Aylesbury Vale (Bucks) 84.3%  South Devon & Torbay 81.7%
 Lambeth (South London) 83.3%  Bath & North East Sussex 80.3%
 Central Manchester 83.2%  Airedale, Wharfdale & Craven (West Yorks) 80.1%

Authors
TAG CLOUD

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